Citirea zilnică – 1 Samuel

1 Samuel

Important Information

Authors: Samuel, Nathan, and Gad
Theme: The Establishing of the Kingdom of Israel

Category: History Fascinating Facts

  • 1 Samuel records the name of God as “Lord of Hosts” for the first time in Scripture (1:3). It is the first of 281 Old Testament occurrences.
  • 1 Samuel contains two of seven suicides recorded in Scripture, and the only back-to-back suicides (31:4–5).
  • Samuel was the last judge of the 350-year period of the judges. Samuel anointed Israel’s first two kings: Saul (10:1) and David (16:13).
  • 1 Samuel is the first biblical book to use the word anointed (2:10), which is the origin of the word messiah.
  • 1 Samuel gives us the original title by which the prophets were known: seer, meaning “to see” (9:9).
  • 1 Samuel contains the first

    mention of a school of prophets, which most believe was founded by Samuel (10:5; 19:20).

  • 1 Samuel opens up with the birth of Samuel, Israel’s last judge, and closes with the death of Saul, Israel’s first king.
  • 1 Samuel contains the only biblical references of the ill-fated name Ichabod, which means “Where is the glory?” (4:21; 14:3).
  • The word prayer is used over thirty times in this book.
  • One of the greatest examples of friendship found anywhere in Scripture, that of David and Jonathan, is recorded in 1 Samuel 18.
  • 1 Samuel describes the largest man found in Scripture, Goliath, who was at least nine feet nine inches tall (17:4)!

Quotable Quotes

It is astonishing how full this book is of prayer. Indeed, it could be viewed as a treatise on prayer vividly illustrated from life. The very name of Samuel means “asked of God,” and it is a monument to a prayer presented and granted. Here we see prayer offered at all times. Therefore, we take the chief message of the book to be the place for, and the power of prayer in all experiences of life. —Robert Lee

For sheer interest, 1 Samuel is unsurpassed. Not only does it record eventful history; it is eventful history interwoven with the biographies of three colorful personalities—Samuel, Saul, and David. —J. Sidlow Baxter

“Behold, I have played the fool.” This is the whole story of man. —G. Campbell Morgan

Notable Notes

The story of the witch at En Dor, whom Saul consulted in chapter 28, has intrigued and puzzled students for years. It is the only instance in Scripture in which God allowed the actual spirit of one of His people to ascend out of the earth and to speak “from the dead.”

Christ Connections

Christ can be found in 1 Samuel as:
Anointed Prophet and Priest True Claimant to the Scepter of Judah and Throne of David

 

1 Samuel records the name of God as “Lord of Hosts” for the first time in Scripture (1:3). It is the first of 281 Old Testament occurrences. 1 Samuel contains two of seven suicides recorded in Scripture, and the only back-to-back suicides (31:4–5). Samuel was the last judge of the 350-year period of the judges. Samuel anointed Israel’s first two kings: Saul (10:1) and David (16:13). 1 Samuel is the first biblical book to use the word anointed (2:10), which is the origin of the word messiah. 1 Samuel gives us the original title by which the prophets were known: seer, meaning “to see” (9:9). 1 Samuel contains the first mention of a school of prophets, which most believe was founded by Samuel (10:5; 19:20). 1 Samuel opens up with the birth of Samuel, Israel’s last judge, and closes with the death of Saul, Israel’s first king. 1 Samuel contains the only biblical references of the ill-fated name Ichabod, which means “Where is the glory?” (4:21; 14:3). The word prayer is used over thirty times in this book. One of the greatest examples of friendship found anywhere in Scripture, that of David and Jonathan, is recorded in 1 Samuel 18. 1 Samuel describes the largest man found in Scripture, Goliath, who was at least nine feet nine inches tall (17:4)! Quotable Quotes It is astonishing how full this book is of prayer. Indeed, it could be viewed as a treatise on prayer vividly illustrated from life. The very name of Samuel means “asked of God,” and it is a monument to a prayer presented and granted. Here we see prayer offered at all times. Therefore, we take the chief message of the book to be the place for, and the power of prayer in all experiences of life. —Robert Lee For sheer interest, 1 Samuel is unsurpassed. Not only does it record eventful history; it is eventful history interwoven with the biographies of three colorful personalities—Samuel, Saul, and David. —J. Sidlow Baxter “Behold, I have played the fool.” This is the whole story of man. —G. Campbell Morgan Notable Notes The story of the witch at En Dor, whom Saul consulted in chapter 28, has intrigued and puzzled students for years. It is the only instance in Scripture in which God allowed the actual spirit of one of His people to ascend out of the earth and to speak “from the dead.” Christ Connections Christ can be found in 1 Samuel as: Anointed Prophet and Priest True Claimant to the Scepter of Judah and Throne of David

Lasseigne, Jeff. Unlocking the Scriptures: What the Bible Is, How We Got It, and Why We Can Trust It (Kindle Locations 2429-2457). Baker Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.


 

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